Tag: dog portraits

Learning Lessons

Another couple of months slip by and I hardly know what I’ve done with them! Of course, our wonderful/terrible cavapom puppy still dominates, and is soon to make her debut in my artwork as the 5th in my series of Microcosms…

Fitting art around a puppy and, recently, deteriorating health, has been a struggle, but here and there I’m been about to break through it all and paint! To get back into oils I painted a beautiful Lurcher called Emrys. You might image one dog portrait is very much like another, but although some features like noses and eyes become familiar, painting this dog required an entirely unfamiliar palette, new facial shapes and proportions, and even different brushwork, to capture the smooth contours of short fur. I painted his face much more in sections, as you can see here, before blending them together. Those soft, soulful eyes were a delight to capture, and quietly watched me as I completed the rest!

Emboldened by my success with Emrys, I turned to completing a challenging painting of water and lemons, as part of my series on Life with Lyme. I struggled most with the lemons. Yellow is a notoriously difficult colour to work with, especially in shadow. Blue in shadow is dark blue; red in shadow is dark red; yellow in shadow lurches in greens and muddy browns. In truth, I made this painting a lot worse before I made it better! After a morning overthinking the yellows, mixing and muddying them, I stepped right back and looked at my reference photo at only thumbnail-size, to discover that what I was lacking was simply pure yellow itself. For the last couple of hours I finished this painting largely by taking a large brush (well, large for me!) and using lemon and cadmium yellow almost straight from the tube. A bit of wasted time perhaps, but another lesson learned!

In August I enjoyed returning to the more conceptual world of my microcosm series. After watching James Fox’s excellent series on Japanese art and culture, I became captivated by the concept of ‘Ma’ or negative space. This is the idea that the space between things is as aesthetically powerful as the things themselves. In music this would be the effect of rests between notes, in writing the things left unsaid, and in art the spaces between objects. Since May I had been musing on the globe alliums in the central bed of our tiny garden. This whole bed is designed around the sphere motif – from yew balls at the corners, to our lollypop privet, to our alliums and verbena bonariensis. The wonderful thing about the alliums is the space captured between the outer skin of flowers which forms the spherical shape. These tiny stars are held on spoke-like stems emanating from the centre. Microcosm is entirely the right word. As one friend pointed out, each flower is like a mini cosmos of stars, but you could look at this stunning structure at a microscopic level too, as a model of the atom itself – largely empty space with electrons orbiting a central nucleus.

So much for the ideas. The execution was fun but fiddly, with each tiny star requiring exact marks to capture the detail of tiny petals, stamen and stigma with clarity. After that it was a question of balancing light and dark so as to convey both the overall shape of the sphere and the recession towards the centre. I was delighted that it was snapped up before I had even completed it, and can’t wait to frame it and hand it over for display in the owner’s first house!

Lastly, I have been expanding my range of tiny treasures with seasonal fruit. We no longer think of strawberries or raspberries as seasonal treasures, thanks to their year-round availability in supermarkets. But, for the first time, this year my husband and I grew our own. With only one raspberry bush and three strawberry plants, each fruit was indeed precious and we generally ate them individually and without accompaniment, to really savour them. We even taste-tested the three varieties of strawberry plants we bought, and were amazed by the variation in flavour. However, the strawberry was an unexpected challenge, and took three goes before I achieved this version. The raspberry was more compliant, and soon my collection of tiny treasures will be available online, so do keep an eye out during September!

Usually I round off with a taster of things to come, but instead I wanted to end with some good news. First, a large selection of my work will be appearing in my first joint exhibition at the end of September, in Hurworth Village Hall, alongside other local photographers and artists. Second, after my disappointment with the rejection of my art from an exhibition a few months ago, I can now celebrate the acceptance of my third microcosm, ‘A World of Many Parts’ into the annual exhibition of the Society for Graphic Fine Art, which will be showing at the Menier Gallery from 2nd to 14th October. I can’t wait to see it on a London gallery wall. If you are in the area, please drop by!